Have you seen the new movie, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader?   It’s based on the third book in The Chronicles of Narnia, by C.S. Lewis.  I was thinking about Narnia recently when suddenly it hit me that a famous detail in the story contains the secret to making the Bible come alive today.  Let me explain.


As you probably know, one of the central images in The Chronicles of Narnia is the wardrobe.  It’s through the wardrobe that the four children—Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy—enter into a whole new world where the lion king Aslan is alive, where Aslan is on the move.  As the story unfolds, we learn that Aslan represents Christ; he’s a picture of God incarnate. And that’s the secret: the Bible is like the wardrobe in Narnia

Think about it; if our main focus in reading the Bible is relational, that is, to get to know the heart, mind and presence of God every day, then we enter into a whole new world where God is alive and God is on the move.  But, if our main focus in reading the Bible is informational, that is, just to learn Bible facts, or gain Bible knowledge, or to stop biblical illiteracy in America, then we find ourselves in a frozen world, where it’s more difficult to grow as a Christian. 

So what’s the point of reading the Bible?  It’s certainly not to become a Bible know-it-all.  Rather, it’s to embrace Aslan.  That’s what makes the Bible come alive today. 

Narnia and the Bible Reading Secret

13 thoughts on “Narnia and the Bible Reading Secret

  • March 16, 2011 at 9:08 pm
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    YES! Marvelous. So simple, so clear. Thank you!

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  • March 17, 2011 at 6:55 am
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    Fantastic analogy. Thank you for sharing this!!

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  • March 17, 2011 at 1:55 pm
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    Eric Metaxas in his biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer quotes a letter that Bonhoeffer wrote to his brother-in-law.
    “Only if we will venture to enter into the words of the Bible, as though in them this God were speaking to us who loves us and does not will to leave us along with our questions, only so shall we learn to rejoice in the Bible…
    “And I would like to tell you now quite personally: since I have learned to read the Bible in this way — and this has not been for so very long — it becomes every day more wonderful to me.”

    I think Bonhoeffer found the Wardrobe!

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  • March 17, 2011 at 3:38 pm
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    Daniel…I love the Bonhoeffer quote. Perfect tie in to what I was trying to communicate. Thanks for sharing it.

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  • March 17, 2011 at 3:47 pm
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    I've tried so many times to start a routine of Bible reading and always fail. Thinking about this being an adventure with Aslan may make this a little easier. Thanks!

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  • March 17, 2011 at 11:04 pm
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    I appreciate your remarks, and like the analogy.

    It's interesting that you think Aslan represents God, because I think many people thing he represents Jesus – especially in one of the books when he sacrifices his life for another.

    Still, lots of ways to see things. Thanks for your thoughts

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  • March 20, 2011 at 7:51 pm
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    I want to respond to the comment from the Anonymous friend above. You are right, Aslan is a Christ figure in the Narnia books, and my blog post didn't bring that out clearly. I've made an edit that clarifies. Thanks for your helpful feedback.

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  • April 24, 2011 at 1:20 am
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    I think that makes complete sense! CS Lewis was a true Christian, and using his stories as a euphimism for us to learn from was genius. I think we should all read the Bible with that in mind. Thanks for the awesome comparison!

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  • April 30, 2011 at 12:46 pm
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    You have made a very insightful observation in this blog. Only those who read Bible this way will be able to see God more clearly and follow Him more closely each day. This should be the primary reason to read and study Bible.

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  • April 13, 2012 at 8:42 pm
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    I love this! I have picked a leaf from your teaching.Mike Uganda

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  • July 24, 2012 at 10:23 pm
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    What should we think of the many verses in the Bible that are plainly wrong, contradictory, or even (by today's standards) evil?

    Ephesians 5:22-24 Wives, submit to your own husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife even as Christ is the head of the church, his body, and is himself its Savior. Now as the church submits to Christ, so also wives should submit in everything to their husbands.
    Exodus 21:20-21 When a man strikes his slave, male or female, with a rod and the slave dies under his hand, he shall be avenged. But if the slave survives a day or two, he is not to be avenged, for the slave is his money.
    1 Peter 2:13-14 Be subject for the Lord’s sake to every human institution, whether it be to the emperor as supreme, or to governors as sent by him to punish those who do evil and to praise those who do good.

    Since God knows all (past, present, future), why are all his explicit commandments, as above, relevant only to that barbaric time, and none that are explicit for today? Shouldn't some of the Bible be directed specifically to “future times”? Why does it appear that God speaks only to an unchanging past?

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