As we come down to the wire in the US election, both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney are nervously watching for an “October Surprise,” a significant, unscripted event that will push momentum (aka “Big Mo”) their way. Well, I’ve come up with a “Christian October Surprise” that either candidate could use to dramatically influence the tone and outcome of the election. And I’m going to reveal what it is, right here, right now, in this lowly, little Bible reading blog.

Thirty years ago, Ronald Reagan asked, “Are you better off today than you were four years ago?” That tipped momentum his way and propelled him to victory over Jimmy Carter. Ever since, politicians have pounded voters with variations of that question like it was a game of Whack-a-Mole.

So I have my own variation of the question, one I believe every Christian should be asking this political season: “Are you more loving today than you were four years ago?” What if either President Obama or Governor Romney made that the theme of their next debate or stump speech? Better yet, what if they both did? Now that would be an October Surprise.

I know, it probably won’t happen. But as Bible-believing Christians, isn’t that the question we should be asking ourselves, regardless of our political affiliation? If we don’t, then all our well-meaning Christian activism runs the risk of making us sound like noisy political gongs or clanging partisan cymbals (1 Cor. 13:1).

A Christian “October Surprise”

One thought on “A Christian “October Surprise”

  • October 18, 2012 at 2:03 pm
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    You're so right, Bro. Whitney. Regardless of our party affiliation, whether we agree with the president or not, we should respect the position that he fills. I have seen so many ugly cartoons and hateful remarks from supposed Christians, it makes me feel sick. Instead of ridiculing him, we should be praying for him and praying for God's will to be done. The world will know we are his disciples by our love.

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